PRIMITIVE BOW and ARROW VIDEOS

  • Ce sujet contient 4 réponses, 2 participants et a été mis à jour pour la dernière fois par KROM, le il y a 5 années et 4 mois.
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  • #2923
    KROM
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    Bow and Arrow

    I made this bow and arrow using only primitive tools and materials.The bow is 1.25 m (55 inches) long and shoots 60 cm (2 feet) long arrows. I don’t know the draw weight – safe to say greater than 15 kg (35 pounds) perhaps? The stave was made from a tree that was cut with a stone axe and split in half with a stone chisel. I don’t know it’s name but it’s common here and is the same wood I use for axe handles (probably Northern Olive (Chionanthus ramiflora). One half was used for the bow and was cut to a length of 1.25 m (50 inches). The limbs of the bow were carved with various stone blades so that the limbs tapered in width, and to a lesser extent depth, towards the tips. The middle of the bow was narrowed in width to form a handle about 12.5 cm (5 inches) long.
    The string was made from the inner bark of a fibrous tree. It was separated into thin strips and left to dry. Then it was twisted into cordage.
    Arrows were made of the same wood as the bow and were 60 cm (2 feet) long. A notch was carved into the back to accept the bow string. They were fletched with bush turkey feathers picked up from the ground (no turkeys were harmed in the making of this video). A feather was split in half and cut into 3 lengths then resin and bark fiber attached the fletching on to the arrows. The tip of the arrow was fire hardened and sharpened to a point. The fletching was trimmed using a hot coal. Each arrow took about an hour to make. A quiver was made of bark to hold the arrows. Importantly, the quiver was worn on the back in the historically accurate style of native American and African archers- not on the hip like medieval European archers (see back quiver: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quiver ).
    I cleared a shooting range with a semi rotten log as a target instead of a hay bale. At 10 meters the accuracy was better than 50 % for this narrow target and the arrows stuck into the wood enough so that they were difficult to pull out. The bow was durable, shooting about 200-300 times with the string breaking only 3 times. I made a back up string and repaired them by splicing the ends back together.
    In conclusion this was an easy bow to make. The short design makes it easy to find a straight piece of wood for the stave. A short string is also easy to make and short arrow shafts are easy to find. Short bows shoot fast and are easy to carry in thick forest. The dimensions of the bow were based on those given in the SAS Survival Handbook by john Lofty Wiseman. but instead of carving it from a stave from the start, I split the stave and then carved it. I think this requires less time, effort and skill. It also gives a flat bow design that’s unlikely to break. It does require wood that doesn’t twist much when split though.
    You can now support Primitive Technology Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2945881&ty=h

    #2924
    Redbow
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    GENIAL !!! 🙂

    Primitive technology
    Description (“à propos”or “about” on youtube page)
    Making primitive huts and tools from scratch using only natural materials in the wild.I also have this blog: https://primitivetechnology.wordpress.com/
    FAQ Q.Where is this?
    A. This is in Far North Queensland Australia.
    Q.Do you live in the wild? A.I don’t live in the wild but just go into the bush to make these projects. Also I camp out here occasionally.
    Q. How did you learn all this?
    A. Researching books and internet plus trial and error. I’m not indigenous and have no army training.
    Q. What about dangerous animals in Australia?
    A. The only really dangerous ones in my area are snakes. Care must be taken when walking about and lifting things from the ground.
    Q. For the mud huts what stops the rain washing the mud walls away? A. The roof.
    Q. Why don’t you talk in the videos?
    A. When I watch how to videos I fast forward past the talking part to see the action part. So I leave it out of my videos in favor of pure demonstration.

    #2925
    Redbow
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    You will find more details of this bow and arrow making process here :
    https://primitivetechnology.wordpress.com/

    #3281
    KROM
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    J’ai choisi de donner un sien d’une série de 3 épisodes de : Allemagne : naissance d’un pays
    C’est le 3 ème, belles images belles infos.
    Au tout début ou voit un chasseur avec un Möllegabet en Orme et des belles flèches…
    Plus loin il y a un passage Néo. avec une micro-scène de chasse au Daim ! 😆 .
    La “Révolution Néolithique” :c’est le début des problèmes de notre société et la destruction de la nature.

    http://www.tv-replay.fr/redirection/11-05-16/allemagne-naissance-d-un-pays-3-3-arte-11586424.html

    #3282
    KROM
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    Réalisation d’un arc préhistorique:
    Commenté par notre ami Antoine et filmé par Gaëlle.
    C’est très sympa ! 🙂

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